Major Grocery Store Issues Recall of its Dog Food

By on February 28, 2013

On the heels of the recent recall of all chicken jerky treats for dogs, this week Hy-Vee, Inc. announced a voluntary recall of certain bags of Hy-Vee dog food due to elevated levels of a chemical contaminant, aflatoxin, commonly found in corn produced at a Kansas City Pro-Pet, LLC plant.  Hy-Vee officials indicated that no illnesses have been reported from consumption of the products by dogs and pose no health risk to humans handling them.  Purchased bags may be returned to the stores for a refund.

The recalled products carry three different “Best By” dates and were distributed to Hy-Vee stores in Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin between October 26, 2012 and January 11, 2013.

The following products are subject to the recall:

Hy-Vee Complete Dog – Complete Nutrition (Green Bag) – 34-lb.
UPC: 07545005647
Lot # ending with: 29812KC
“Best By” Date: 11/24/13
 

Hy-Vee Complete Dog – Complete Nutrition (Green Bag) – 8-lb

UPC: 07545005667
Lot # ending with: 29812KC
“Best By” Date: 11/24/13
 

Hy-Vee Complete Dog – Complete Nutrition (Green Bag) – 4.4-lb.

UPC: 07545005665
Lot # ending with: 29812KC
“Best By” Date: 11/24/13
 

Hy-Vee Complete Dog – Complete Nutrition (Green Bag) – 4.4-lb.

UPC: 07545005665
Lot # ending with: 29912KC
“Best By” Date:   11/25/13
 

Hy-Vee Complete Dog – Bites, Bones & Squares (Yellow Bag) – 20-lb.

UPC: 07545005680
Lot # ending with: 29312KC
“Best By” Date: 11/19/13
 

Hy-Vee Complete Dog – Bites, Bones & Squares (Yellow Bag) – 4.4-lb.

UPC: 07545005560
Lot # ending with: 29312KC
“Best By” Date: 11/19/13

 

Recalls of pet products have become an all too common occurrence in recent years. After the Menu Foods recall in 2007 that effected over 40 brands of food that were contaminated with melamine and caused illness and death in pets, pet owners are left wondering why this is still happening.  Unfortunately, government regulation does not do very much to oversee the pet food industry.  Also it can be almost impossible to determine that pet food might be responsible for a pet’s illness or death.  Unless a pet food company is proactive in testing its products for contamination or reacts to a rash of complaints from pet owners about its products, pets’ health from consuming these products will remain at risk.  More government oversight of the industry and accountability are necessary to protect pets and their owners who may also be at risk from handling these products.